30 years later: Russia's prospects are impressive

In 2015, former US President Barack Obama made a statement that ridiculed half the world. Words that Russian economy "torn to shreds" turned into a kind of meme. Three years have passed since then. The economic situation in Russia is generally stable, gold and foreign exchange reserves are growing, the ruble exchange rate allows domestic producers to compete effectively in the international market.


What is the future of Russia? What will become of our country in 30 years?

One of the leading consulting companies in the world, PWC is confident that by 2050, our country will remain in sixth place in the ranking of countries in terms of GDP. However, at the same time, the top five will leave the economies of Japan and Germany. The retirement of the latter will mean the formation of the largest Russian economy in Europe. The current leaders of the US ranking will be pushed by China and India, which will take first and second place, respectively.

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  1. Fedorov Offline Fedorov
    Fedorov (Valery) 7 March 2018 02: 15
    +1
    So I came home. What do I see. - Turkish locks, all German on / off switches, Chinese slippers, narrow-eyed dishes, a microwave from Hong Kong, a TV set from South Korea, a German vacuum cleaner, all clothes don't even smell like Russia .. sad Bosch turned on the kettle, the dog is a bulldog and that French, the Korean fridge is guarding. Shave, wash - nothing Russian.
    I bought myself a mozaclet with a bridge on a stroller, to go picking mushrooms (at least something familiar) "URAL", and that pancake is not quite Russian.
    I do not panic, but confront the fact.
    1. with the BBC Offline with the BBC
      with the BBC (Vadim) 20 March 2018 21: 45
      -1
      Our leaders are not familiar with such devices ...
  2. gridasov Offline gridasov
    gridasov 11 March 2018 14: 58
    +1
    Only if you look another thirty years ahead, the situation could change dramatically if Russia continues to rely on exhaustible energy resources.