Revealed the nature of the damage to the US submarine after the incident in the South China Sea


In early October, the American submarine USS Connecticut (SSN-22) of the Seawolf II class collided with an unknown object in the South China Sea. After the incident, the boat was forced to change course and leave for Guam (Micronesia, Western Pacific Ocean) for repairs and damage assessment. On Thursday, October 28, the US Naval Institute announced the nature of the damage to the submarine.


During the collision, USS Connecticut damaged the ballast tanks in the bow, the nuclear installations of the submarine were not damaged. None of the sailors on board the boat received life-threatening injuries. However, the damage from the incident has not yet been fully assessed.

Repairs to the damaged submarine could disrupt the lineup of such work for other boats and ships, according to US Navy spokesman Jay Stephanie. At the same time, in the United States, submarines traditionally do not have priority over surface ships in terms of service. In addition, there is no dry dock in Guam where repair work could be carried out in full.

According to media reports, while patrolling in the Indo-Pacific region, the American nuclear submarine practiced intercepting Chinese submarines on the route of the United States aircraft carrier battle group. The underwater collision took place east of the Paracel Islands, 230 km south of China and 200 km east of Vietnam.
  • Photos Used: US Navy
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  1. Alexey Davydov (Alexey) 29 October 2021 18: 38
    +1
    According to media reports, while patrolling in the Indo-Pacific region, the American nuclear submarine practiced intercepting Chinese submarines on the route of the United States aircraft carrier battle group.

    Slightly "intercepted"
  2. Bakht Offline Bakht
    Bakht (Bakhtiyar) 29 October 2021 19: 51
    +1
    If this is not a fake, then this is how Connecticut came to base

    1. beeper Offline beeper
      beeper 29 October 2021 20: 26
      +3
      hi Comrade Bakht, this is also an American submarine (previously in a similar accident), but NOT "Connecticut" (as, indeed, in the title photo)! request
      At "Sea Wolves" the front rudders are NOT located on the wheelhouse!
      And the emergency "American" is still NOT in dry dock!
      1. Bakht Offline Bakht
        Bakht (Bakhtiyar) 29 October 2021 21: 21
        +2
        Therefore, I wrote, "if not a fake."
        I wonder what kind of boat then with such damage.
        1. beeper Offline beeper
          beeper 30 October 2021 00: 02
          +2
          Quote: Bakht
          Therefore, I wrote, "if not a fake."
          I wonder what kind of boat then with such damage.

          hi This is the San Francisco MAPL (SSN-711) of the Los Angeles class.

          From the wiki information:

          January 8, 2005 at 02:43 GMT, a San Francisco submarine 675 kilometers (364 miles, 420 miles) southeast of Guam at * full speed and a depth of 160m (525 ft) collided with a seamount. The collision was so severe that the vessel almost sank - there was a struggle for positive buoyancy for surfacing after the front ballast tanks were pierced. Ninety-eight crew members were injured, and second class assistant driver Joseph Allen (24) died on January 9 from head injuries. Other crew members sustained various injuries such as bone fractures, lacerations and back injuries. The submarine's front ballast tanks and the fairing of the head sonar were seriously damaged, but its inner hull was not punctured, and there was no damage to the nuclear reactor.

          * Full speed under water for this "Elk" ~ 30 knots! fellow
          The crew is 110 (including 12 officers) people, i.e. almost all of them were injured in the collision.
  3. bobba94 Offline bobba94
    bobba94 (Vladimir) 29 October 2021 21: 22
    0
    I read the headline, then read the article ..... I thought ... I read the headline again and then read the article ...... I thought again .... And only then, when I read "US Navy photographs are used", it dawned on me ......