The United States put into orbit a module for transmitting electricity from space to Earth


The American "space plane" X-37B went on a regular mission, the sixth in a row. As before, most unmanned mini-shuttle programs will perform in the interests of the military. However, this time, not all experiments are marked with a security stamp.


For example, one of the spacecraft’s current tasks was launching a prototype of a photovoltaic module into orbit, which will collect solar energy and transmit it to Earth through microwave radiation. An experimental device called the Photovoltaic Radio-frequency Antenna Module is a 30-cm module equipped with solar cells and a radio frequency antenna.

The essence of perspective Technology consists in the fact that the device will convert the energy collected in orbit into microwave radiation and direct it to a ground-based receiver. The latter, in turn, will perform the reverse transformation and transfer energy to the final consumer.


It is worth noting that microwave radiation as a "transporter" of the collected electricity is not in vain. It is this method of transmission that allows you to overcome the terrestrial atmosphere with the least loss of energy.

If the technology meets its expectations, then in the future a full-fledged prototype system with the possibility of installation on a satellite will be created. The latter could function around the clock and provide electricity to military bases or disaster zones located in remote corners of the planet.
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  1. Dear sofa expert. 19 May 2020 16: 36
    0
    Americans have once developed a ballpoint pen that writes in zero gravity. A very valuable invention. Reminded a joke about non-alcoholic vodka: To be tasty, like real, vodka was, but not inserted).
    1. Cyril Offline Cyril
      Cyril (Kirill) 22 May 2020 14: 29
      -1
      Americans once developed a ballpoint pen that writes in zero gravity. A very valuable invention.

      Yes, and it is very successfully used now. And in 1969, the USSR purchased 100 Fisher pens and another 1000 cartridges for them for its Soyuz space program.

      So it goes.
  2. 123 Online 123
    123 (123) 19 May 2020 18: 51
    +2
    It is worth noting that microwave radiation as a "transporter" of the collected electricity is not in vain. It is this method of transmission that allows you to overcome the terrestrial atmosphere with the least loss of energy.

    Something the prospect of charging the phone in this way is not particularly smiling at me. Who knows where the beam will go ... And how it affects living organisms and electronics, they can experiment on their own with a microwave at home.
    Naturally, the method was chosen for a reason, it is not only a valuable fur (in the sense of electric power transmission), but also a microwave gun.
    Congratulations to all on the start of an arms race in space. drinks Americans are stubbornly developing this technology.

    https://lenta.ru/news/2018/03/27/raytheon/

    And now they are taking her out into space.
  3. Winnie Offline Winnie
    Winnie (Winnie) 19 May 2020 18: 58
    -1
    ... in the future, a full-fledged prototype system with the possibility of installation on a satellite will be created. The latter could function around the clock and provide electricity to military bases or disaster zones located in remote corners of the planet.

    For some reason, Americans are silent that microwave radiation can be used as a weapon. (I hope everyone remembers the cat in the microwave.)
  4. Georgievic Offline Georgievic
    Georgievic (Georgievic) 19 May 2020 21: 17
    +3
    That's for sure! Test the prototype satellite microwave weapon! For peaceful purposes, FIG does not need such a method of energy delivery!
  5. aleksandrmakedo Offline aleksandrmakedo
    aleksandrmakedo (Dubovitsky Victor Kuzmich) 19 May 2020 23: 23
    +1
    In order to transfer energy to a distance, it is not at all necessary to launch this piece of iron into space. It was possible to send this energy ray from Earth to space, and recharge satellite batteries. And making sure of the prospects, do the second part of the experiment.
  6. aleksandrmakedo Offline aleksandrmakedo
    aleksandrmakedo (Dubovitsky Victor Kuzmich) 19 May 2020 23: 37
    +1
    Quote: Winnie
    ... in the future, a full-fledged prototype system with the possibility of installation on a satellite will be created. The latter could function around the clock and provide electricity to military bases or disaster zones located in remote corners of the planet.

    For some reason, Americans are silent that microwave radiation can be used as a weapon. (I hope everyone remembers the cat in the microwave.)

    Kilowatt power and distance from emitter to victim in millimeters. Radiation power dissipation is proportional to the square of the distance. To roast a cat with a beam 200 kilometers away, you need to collect teraWatt power in a field the size of Manhattan. Less will not work. Microwave radiation is not very successfully bundled into a beam. Light can be collected at this distance into a spot the size of a car.

    Special opinion: About a laser scam.

    https://aftershock.news/?q=node/34005&full
  7. Bakht Online Bakht
    Bakht (Bakhtiyar) 19 May 2020 23: 57
    +1
    The transfer of energy to the distance involved Nikola Tesla. A lot of secret and incomprehensible. There are many admirers and disowners. It seems that N. Tesla made a diary entry.

    “Launch number 11. Three pulses at intervals of 60 seconds. " And then, without waiting for the official evidence that came later, Tesla writes: “It was an explosion. The blast wave reached New York. There, in Siberia, a monstrous explosion occurred. Explosion of natural electricity. Giant ball lightning. It happened. ”

    True or not, Tesla carried the secret to the grave. But the fact that he was a genius is beyond doubt. It seems that on June 30, 1908, he sent an impulse of energy into space, calculated on reflection from the moon. According to calculations, the reflected impulse should have been in Siberia.
  8. cmonman Online cmonman
    cmonman (Garik Mokin) 20 May 2020 00: 36
    0
    For the curious:

    “The story of a ballpoint pen that writes in zero gravity, upside down, in water.”
    Paul C. Fisher (Paul C. Fisher) worked during World War II with ball bearings in a propeller factory. After that, he began working in a pen factory and established himself as an innovator. He then opened his own pen manufacturing company. When he came up with the idea of ​​getting a pen, he did not try to send it into space. He just wanted to make a pen that wouldn't leak. He experimented for several years, invested $ 1 million and made his first Antigravity pen, the AG7, which he patented in 1966. The ink in this pen was not exposed to air, but was under pressure, which replaced the ink. Because of this, he did not rely on gravity, so he could write upside down or when there was no gravity at all. It also did not leak and did not dry out. It can also operate at temperatures from -35 ° C to + 120 ° C. The Space Pen is made of tungsten carbide. It fits accurately, preventing leakage.
    At almost the same time, NASA was trying to find a pencil that they would use in space travel. They ordered 34 mechanical pencils from Tycam Engineering Manufacturing, Inc. in Houston for $ 128,89 for use in the Gemini project. The problem with pencils (aside from their price in this case) was that when they broke, the tip would fly all over the place and, since graphite conducts electricity, it could short-circuit things that are very dangerous in space. Fischer offered his pen to NASA, and after two years of testing, they bought 400 pens at $ 6 per pen to use on Apollo 7. At that time, USSR cosmonauts used bold pencils and the USSR bought 100 pens and 1000 ink for refueling.
  9. isofat Offline isofat
    isofat (isofat) 20 May 2020 00: 57
    0
    The author of the article forgot to subscribe - Munchausen.